Monthly Archives: January 2013

Hollywood’s depiction of guns is fraudulent, says Dustin Hoffman

Oscar-winner also accuses the industry of discriminating against actors who don’t want to use guns in films

The Oscar-winning actor Dustin Hoffman has dismissed the depiction of gun violence in Hollywood as “fraudulent” and claimed that studios actively discriminate against actors who refuse to carry firearms onscreen.

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Movie 43: why did so many Hollywood stars sign up for the humiliation?

Critics have described grossout comedy Movie 43 as the worst film of all time. So how did the likes of Halle Berry, Kate Winslet and Hugh Jackman end up starring in it? Continue reading… Continue reading

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Les Misérables: not as revolutionary as it seems

Every showtune rendered in grubby closeup does not a historically accurate film make. Just which French Revolution are we talking about here?Director: Tom HooperEntertainment grade: CHistory grade: C Continue reading… Continue reading

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Quentin Tarantino refuses to answer question from Krishnan Guru-Murthy – video

Quentin Tarantino refuses to answer a question about violence in movies during an interview with Channel 4 News to promote new film Django Unchained. Krishnan Guru-Murthy asks the director whether there is a link between enjoying movie violence and enj… Continue reading

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What Richard Did – review

An intelligent drama set in Dublin that throbs in your head long after it’s finished

Irish director Lenny Abrahamson emerges with his third feature as a premier league film-maker. Each of his movies looks different from the others – there are no repeated auteurist mannerisms – and yet the potent, creative intelligence behind them is plain. His first film, Adam and Paul (2004), had something of Beckett with its two smackheads at large in Dublin; his second, Garage (2007), was a tragicomedy about a lonely petrol station attendant in a higher social-realist style (though working with same writer, Mark O’Halloran).

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Les Miserables – review

Tom Hooper’s film is a colossal effort – after 158 minutes, you really have experienced something. It’s just not clear what

Like a diabolically potent combination of Lionel Bart and Leni Riefenstahl, the movie version of Les Misérables has arrived, based on the hit stage show adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel set among the deserving poor in 19th-century France, which climaxes with the anti-monarchist Paris uprising of 1832. Even as a non-believer in this kind of “sung-through” musical, I was battered into submission by this mesmeric and sometimes compelling film, featuring a performance of dignity and intelligence from Hugh Jackman, and an unexpectedly vulnerable singing turn from that great, big, grumpy old bear, Russell Crowe. With the final rousing chorus of “Do you hear the people sing?”, the revolutionary-patriotic fervour is so bizarrely stirring, you’ll feel like marching out of the cinema, wrapped in the tricolour, and travelling to Russia to find Gérard Depardieu and tear him limb from limb.

Just as some celebrities are so successful they come to be known only by their first names, this is known everywhere by its abbreviation: Lay-miz, impossible to say without a twinkle of camp. It’s enjoyed staggering global success on stage since 1985. This version, directed by Tom Hooper, of The King’s Speech fame, has all the singing recorded live on set, with actors listening to a pianist via earpieces, and the orchestral soundtrack added later. The result is a bracing, rough-and-ready immediacy from performers who can and do hold a tune.

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Baftas 2013: full list of nominations

A full list of nominations for this year’s Baftas, which saw Lincoln lead the pack with tenArgoLes MiserablesLife of PiLincolnZero Dark Thirty Continue reading… Continue reading

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Quartet – review

Dustin Hoffman directs a stellar cast in this bittersweet tale of ageing opera singers forced to face their mortality Continue reading… Continue reading

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The Impossible is ‘beautifully accurate’, writes tsunami survivor

Guardian reader Simon Jenkins was in Thailand when the 2004 tsunami struck. Here he responds to criticisms leveled at The Impossible, which suggested the film overlooked the majority of the disaster’s victims Continue reading… Continue reading

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The Impossible submerges the true impact of the tsunami

JA Bayona’s disaster movie is accomplished, but overlooks the overwhelming majority of the 2004 disaster’s victims Continue reading… Continue reading

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